William Wegman
[Artist, b. 1943, Holyoke, Massachusetts, lives in New York.]

 I get so confused about life photography art. 
 I just imagined you were a camera. 
 As soon as I got funny, I killed any majestic intentions in my work. 
 Photography as a subject is a good one. Its history is only about 150 years... You only have to know about twenty-five or thirty names and that’s it. All you need. In painting there are more than 1,000. 
 When I first started making photo pieces it wasn’t with the idea of a commitment to the medium. I didn’t think I would have to become a photographer to make my photographs. I recall that anything could be used as material for art in that era. Photography was just one more thing. 
 The best thing about Fay isn’t visible in a photo. It’s her voice. You say: “Fay, speak,” and she sounds like a distant thunderstorm. (On his canine model, Fay Ray; 1987.) 
 In 1978 I decided not to work with Man Ray as an act of self-discipline. I didn’t want to rely on him. Man Ray hated not working, though. He would come into my studio, see me drawing or working on photographs, and just slump down at my feet with a big sigh. Fortunately for both of us the year ended. Polaroid had invented a new camera, the twenty-by-twenty-four, and I was invited to Cambridge, Mass., to experiment with it. Naturally, I took Man Ray and we were working again. 
 My Weimaraners are perfect fashion models. Their elegant, slinky forms are covered in gray—and gray, everyone knows, goes with anything. 
quotes 1-8 of 14
page 1 of 2 next page last page
display quotes