Pablo Picasso
[Artist, b. 1881, Málaga, Spain, d. 1973, Mougin, France.]

 When you see what you express through photography, you realize all the things that can no longer be the objective of painting. Why should the artist persist in treating subjects that can be established so clearly with the lens of a camera? 
 Photography has arrived at the point where it is capable of liberating painting from all literature, from the anecdote, and even from the subject. In any case, a certain aspect of the subject now belongs to the domain of photography. So shouldn’t painters profit from their newly acquired liberty, and make use of it to do other things? 
 Who sees the human face correctly: the photographer, the mirror, or the painter? 
 Two of the most frustrated trades are dentists and photographers—dentists because they want to be doctors and photographers because they want to be painters.