Marilyn Nance
[Photographer and artist, b. 1953, New York, lives in Fort Greene, Brooklyn.]

 Things haven’t really changed for black folks, and we know it. The old folks know it. The middle-aged folks know it. Young folks know it—we all know it. We nod to each other when we see ourselves on the street. (That’s why white folks think all black folks know each other.) We share a secret... that we are human beings, that we love, that we invent, that we brush our teeth, that we vacuum our rugs, that we throw out our junk mail. All of that. We carry in each of us all the stories that are withheld from the history books and kept out of the media, erased from common knowledge. My work deals with the souls of black folks and our quest for social change... I’m being asked to tell my story of how things haven't really changed. 
 I call myself a photographer now because, eventually, you have to choose something. People just don’t understand it when you tell them, “I do film, I do video...” So I just chose to call myself a photographer.