Robert Adams
[Photographer and writer, b. 1937, Orange, New Jersey, lives in Astoria, Oregon.]

 With a camera, one has to love individual cases. 
 Invention in photography is so laborious as to be in most instances perverse. 
 Landscape photography can offer us, I think, three verities—geography, autobiography, and metaphor. 
 For a shot to be good—suggestive of more than just what it is—it has to come perilously near to being bad, just a view of stuff. (1970) 
 Lewis Hine said he hoped to show what was wrong so that we would try to change it, and what was right so we could take comfort in it. I don’t often achieve that, but the two goals seem appropriate to me. 
 By Interstate 70: a dog skeleton, a vacuum cleaner, TV dinners, a doll, a pie, rolls of carpet... Later, next to the South Platte River: algae, broken concrete, jet contrails, the smell of crude oil... What I hope to document, though not at the expense of surface detail, is the form that underlies this apparent chaos. 
 No place is boring, if you’ve had a good night’s sleep and have a pocket full of unexposed film. 
 The operating principle that seems to work best is to go to the landscape that frightens you the most and take pictures until you’re not scared anymore. (1982) 
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