Diane Arbus
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 1971, New York.]

 One thing that struck me very early is that you don’t put into a photograph what’s going to come out. Or, vice versa, what comes out is not what you put in. 
 I never have taken a picture I’ve intended. They’re always better or worse. 
 The thing that’s important to know is that you never know. You’re always sort of feeling your way. 
 Everything is so superb and breathtaking. I am creeping forward on my belly like they do in war movies. 
 Most people go through life dreading they’ll have a traumatic experience. Freaks were born with their trauma. They’ve already passed their test in life. They’re aristocrats. 
 The photograph is a secret about a secret, the more it tells you the less you know. 
 I don’t press the shutter. The image does. And it’s like being gently clobbered. 
 What moves me about... what’s called technique... is that it comes from some mysterious deep place. I mean it can have something to do with the paper and the developer and all that stuff, but it comes mostly from some very deep choices somebody has made that take a long time and keep haunting them. 
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