Arthur Rothstein
[Writer, b. 1915, New York, d. 1985, New Rochelle, New York.]

 ...a photographer must be aware of and concerned about the words that accompany a picture. These words should be considered as carefully as the lighting, exposure and composition of the photograph. 
 In conclusion, the idea of direction on the part of the photographer has its greatest value when its processes are least discernible to the spectator. 
 The Farm Security file would never have been created if we hadn’t the freedom to photograph anything, anywhere in the United States—anything that we came across that seemed interesting, and vital. 
 It is sometimes desirable to distort or accentuate with lenses of various focal lengths... Deliberate distortion may actually add to its reality. 
 The photographer [must] become not only a cameraman but a scenarist, dramatist, and director as well... Providing the results are a faithful reproduction of what the photographer believes he sees, whatever takes place in the making of the picture is justified. In my opinion, therefore, it is logical to make things happen before the camera and, when possible to control the actions of the subject. (1943)