Henri Cartier-Bresson
[Photographer and painter, b. 1908, Chanteloup, France, d. 2004, Paris.]

 Sometimes a single event can be so rich in itself and its facets that it is necessary to move all around it in your search for the solution to the problem it poses—for the world is movement, and you cannot be stationary in your attitude toward something that is moving. 

Jean-Luc Godard
[Filmmaker, b. 1930, Paris, lives in Rolle, Switzerland.]

 There are no more simple images... The world is too much for an image. You need several of them, a chain of images... 

Joel Meyerowitz
[Photographer, b. 1938, New York, lives in New York.]

 What I think is so extraordinary about the photograph is that we have a piece of paper with this image adhered to it, etched on it, which interposes itself into the plane of time that we are actually in at that moment. Even if it comes from as far back as 150 years ago, or as recently as yesterday, or a minute before as a Polaroid color photograph, suddenly you bring it into your experience. You look at it, and all around the real world is humming, buzzing and moving, and yet in this little frame there is stillness that looks like the world. That connection, that collision, that interfacing, is one of the most astonishing things we can experience. 

Leon Golub
[Artist, b. 1922, Chicago, Illinois, d. 2004, New York.]

 The freeze of a photographic gesture, the fix of an action, how an arm twists, how a smile gets momentarily stabilized or exaggerated—to try to get some of this is important... The photofix inflects the almost literal shaping of a figure, changes of movement or potential movement, and a sense of occurrence or event. 

John Ashbery
[Poet and critic, b. 1927, Rochester, New York, d. 2017, Hudson, New York.]

 For although memories, of a season, for example,
Melt into a single snapshot, one cannot guard, treasure
That stalled moment. It too is flowing, fleeting;

It is a picture of flowing, scenery, though living, mortal,
Over which an abstract action is laid out in blunt,

Harsh strokes.
  

Gilles Deleuze
[Writer and philosopher, b. 1925, Paris, d. 1995, Paris.]

 External images act on me, transmit movement to me, and I return movement: how could images be in my consciousness since I am myself image, that is, movement? 

Jacques Lacan
[Writer and psychoanalyst, b. 1901, Paris, France, d. 1981, Paris.]

 The evil eye is the fascinum, it is that which has the effect of arresting movement and, literally, of killing life. At the moment the subject stops, suspending his gesture, he is mortified. This anti-life, anti-movement function of the terminal point is the fascinum, and it is precisely one of the dimensions in which the power of the gaze is exercised directly. 

Susan Meiselas
[Photographer, b. 1948, Baltimore, Maryland, lives in New York.]

 Looking at contact sheets, it’s a great set of footprints. Either you got it or you didn’t. You could have gotten it, you should’ve moved. I think you’re plagued with that and then suddenly you find a frame and it just seems to be there, it just seems to know itself and sort of reveal itself. That’s the harmony. 
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