Brett Weston
[Photographer, b. 1911, Los Angeles, d. 1993, Kona, Hawaii.]

 I use various types of cameras and photograph anything, anytime. It could be something modern or an ancient rock, it doesn’t matter. But, unless a landscape is invested with a sense of mystery, it is no better than a postcard. 

Franz Kafka
[Writer, b. 1883, Prague, d. 1924, Prague.]

 A picture of my existence... would show a useless wooden stake covered in snow... stuck loosely at a slant in the ground in a ploughed field on the edge of a vast open plain on a dark winter night. 

Robert Adams
[Photographer and writer, b. 1937, Orange, New Jersey, lives in Astoria, Oregon.]

 Many have asked, pointing incredulously toward a sweep of tract homes and billboards, why picture that? The question sounds simple, but it implies a difficult issue—why open our eyes anywhere but in undamaged places like national parks? 

Ansel Adams
[Photographer, b. 1902, San Francisco, d. 1984, Carmel, California.]

 Landscape photography is the supreme test of the photographer—and often the supreme disappointment. 

R. Crumb
[Cartoonist, b. 1943, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, lives in Sauve, France.]

 They were just snapshots, nothing special, nothing particularly artistic. They were used for utility purposes.
(On photographs of mundane streetscapes he had “Stanley Something-or-other” take in Sacramento in 1988 to serve as backgrounds to his cartoons. “People don’t draw it, all this crap, people don’t focus attention on it because it’s ugly, it’s bleak, it’s depressing... But, this is the world we live in; I wanted my work to reflect that, the background reality of urban life.”) 

Emmet Gowin
[Photographer, b. 1941, Danville, Virginia, lives in Princeton, New Jersey.]

 This is the gift of the landscape photograph, that the heart finds a place to stand. 

Mark Klett
[Photographer, b. 1952, Albany, New York, lives in Tempe, Arizona.]

 So much of what we know, and what we think we know, about the land has first passed through someone's lens. The interesting thing is to make use of this history, not merely to be absorbed into it. For me, landscape photographs begin as the artifacts of personal moments. They get interesting when they become cultural commentary. 

Robert Adams
[Photographer and writer, b. 1937, Orange, New Jersey, lives in Astoria, Oregon.]

 Nature photography… that acknowledges what is wrong, is admittedly sometimes hard to bear—it has to encompass our mistakes. Yet in the long run, it is important; in order to endure our age of apocalypse, we have to be reconciled not only to avalanche and hurricane, but to ourselves. 
quotes 17-24 of 75
first page previous page page 3 of 10 next page last page
display quotes