George W. Bush
[Politician, b. 1946, in New Haven, Connecticut, lives in Dallas, Texas.]

 There are cameras nowadays that have been developed to tell the difference between a squirrel and a bomb. 

Diane Arbus
[Photographer, b. 1923, New York, d. 1971, New York.]

 If I were just curious, it would be very hard to say to someone, “I want to come to your house and have you talk to me and tell me the story of your life.” I mean people are going to say, “You’re crazy.” Plus they’re going to keep mighty guarded. But the camera is a kind of license. A lot of people, they want to be paid that much attention and that’s a reasonable kind of attention to be paid. 

John Tagg
[Writer, theorist, and photohistorian, b. 1949, North Shields, England, lives in Ithica, New York.]

 Like the state, the camera is never neutral. The representations it produces are highly coded, and the power it wields is never its own. As a means of record, it arrives on the scene vested with a particular authority to arrest, picture, and transform daily life... This is not the power of the camera but the power of the apparatuses of the local state which deploy it and guarantee the authority of the images it constructs to stand as evidence or register a truth. 

Susan Sontag
[Writer, theorist, and critic, b. 1933, New York, d. 2004, New York.]

 Cameras define reality in two ways essential to the workings of an advanced industrial society: as a spectacle (for masses) and as an object of surveillance (for rulers). The production of images also furnishes a ruling ideology. Social change is replaced by a change in images. The freedom to consume a plurality of images and goods is equated with freedom itself. 

John Baldessari
[Artist, b. 1931, National City, California, lives in Venice, California.]

 Probably one of the worst things to happen to photography is that cameras have viewfinders. 

Alfred Stieglitz
[Photographer and curator, b. 1864, Hoboken, New Jersey, d. 1946, New York.]

 My own camera is of the simplest pattern and has never left me in the lurch, although it has had some tough handling in wind and storm… a shutter working at a speed of one-fourth to one-twenty-fifth of a second will answer all purposes. Microscopic sharpness is of no pictorial value. (1897) 

Margaret Bourke-White
[Photographer, b. 1904, New York, d. 1971, Darien, Connecticut.]

 Saturate yourself with your subject and the camera will all but take you by the hand. 

Lynsey Addario
[Photographer, b. 1973, Norwalk, Connecticut, lives in Islington, England.]

 When I was behind a camera, it was the only place in the world I wanted to be. 
quotes 9-16 of 360
first page previous page page 2 of 45 next page last page
display quotes