Edward Weston
[Photographer, b. 1886, Highland Park, Illinois, d. 1958, Wildcat Hill, California.]

 The photograph isolates and perpetuates a moment of time: an important and revealing moment, or an unimportant and meaningless one, depending upon the photographer's understanding of his subject and mastery of his process. 
 When subject matter is forced to fit into preconceived patterns, there can be no freshness of vision. Following rules of composition can only lead to a tedious repetition of pictorial clichés. 
 My work is never intellectual. I never make a negative unless emotionally moved by my subject. 
 Art is an interpreter of the inexpressible, and therefore it seems a folly to try to convey its meaning afresh by means of words. 
 Anything that excites me for any reason I will photograph; not searching for unusual subject matter, but making the commonplace unusual. 
 As great a picture can be made as one’s mental capacity—no greater. Art cannot be taught; it must be self-inspiration, though the imagination may be fired and the ambition and work directed by the advice and example of others. 
 Ultimately success or failure in photographing people depends on the photographer’s ability to understand his fellow man. 
 The world is full of sloppy bohemians and their work betrays them. 
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